Is vaping really that harmful?

GEHA | August 2, 2021

everyday health smoking cessation health and wellness
E-cigarette use has been linked to lung, heart, brain and gum illnesses.

We’ve all heard about the health risks of smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products. When e-cigarettes came on the scene, many people thought vaping was a safer alternative.

Studies have proven otherwise. E-cigarette use has been linked to lung, heart, brain and gum cancers and illnesses.

E-cigarettes contain nicotine or tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), as well as vape oils containing chemicals and metals including nickel, tin, lead, flavorings like diacetyl and other ultra-fine particles. The aerosol that users inhale and exhale from e-cigarettes can expose themselves and bystanders to these harmful substances.

You may have trouble breathing, experience excessive coughing, chest pain, nausea, fatigue, vomiting and develop mouth and tongue sores. Vaping nicotine can also affect your heart health because it raises your blood pressure and heart rate, putting you at a greater risk of a heart attack. E-cigarette users were 56% more likely to have a heart attack than non-users.

For tips and advice on how to quit smoking, check out any of these helpful resources:

  • 1-800-QUIT-NOW – This support line offers free quit coaching, a free quit plan, free educational materials and referrals to local resources.
  • smokefree.gov – Smokefree.gov allows you to choose the help that best fits your needs.
  • cancer.org – Browse this page for help — for yourself or anyone you know who's trying to quit.
  • truthinitiative.org – 10 steps to successfully make a plan to quit smoking.
  • lung.org – The American Lung Association offers resources to help smokers figure out their reasons for quitting and then take the big step of quitting for good.

Sources:
“4 Major Health Risks Linked to E-Cigarette Use.” webmd.com, WebMD LLC.
“Benefits of Quitting.” www.smokefree.gov, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.